ALEXANDER FERGUSON, during the existence of the Dundee Political Union, was looked upon as a zealous political character, ready to sacrifice everything at the shrine of his party ; but ultimately, upon the death of Joseph Dempster, in July 1840, he settled down into the not over-well-paid office of Town Crier. This office, however, he did not retain very long, as he died of fever in the Infirmary on Thursday, Dec. 15, 1842. In Feb. 1843, Alexander Ferguson—a namesake—was appointed his successor by the Magistrates. Like so many of his predecessors, some characteristic anecdotes are told of Ferguson. On the conflagration of the town churches, on the first Sunday in 1841, he was requested by one of the burnt out ministers to go round with the bell and announce arrangements for public worship. ' I 'm sure you've gotten your prayers answered this day,' said Ferguson. 'I 've often heard you wish for " a wa' o' fire roond your Zion," but ye've gotten as muckle as sud please you for ae week, at ony rate!'

Bibliography:

Norrie, W. Dundee Celebrities of the Nineteenth Century P.81

Please click here for Plot no. 1265